30 Creative Alternative to Ficus Hedge for South Florida Landscaping

Ficus whitefly

Is a significant pest in South Florida that primarily affects Ficus trees, including the popular Ficus benjamina,  The insect was first reported in Florida in 2007 and has since spread to other parts of the state, including Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties.

The Ficus whitefly feeds on the sap of Ficus leaves, causing them to turn yellow, dry out, and drop prematurely. Infestations can lead to significant defoliation and can weaken the tree’s health, making it more susceptible to other pests and diseases. In severe cases, Ficus whitefly infestations can kill the tree.

There have been reports of Ficus whitefly resistance to neonicotinoids, which are a common class of insecticides used to control pest. Neonicotinoids work by disrupting the nervous system of insects, causing paralysis and death.

Several studies have shown that Ficus whiteflies can develop resistance to neonicotinoids after repeated exposure to the insecticide. Resistance can develop when the whiteflies possess mutations or changes in their genetic makeup that enable them to survive exposure to the chemical.

The development of resistance to neonicotinoids underscores the importance of using integrated pest management strategies that incorporate multiple control methods, including cultural practices, biological control, and insecticide rotations. It is also important to use insecticides judiciously and follow label instructions carefully to reduce the likelihood of resistance development.

Ficus Benjamina

also known as weeping fig, is a popular plant for landscaping and indoor decoration. However, in recent years, it has become vulnerable to a pest called the ficus whitefly, which can cause significant damage to the plant and surrounding vegetation. This has led many people to seek alternative options to the traditional ficus hedge.

Fortunately, there are many excellent alternatives to ficus that can provide similar aesthetic and functional benefits without the risk of pest infestations. Here are some of the top choices for those looking to replace their ficus hedge:

  1. Podocarpus: This evergreen shrub has a similar appearance to the ficus hedge, with glossy green leaves and a dense growth habit. It is also resistant to pests and diseases.
  2. Simpson’s stopper: This native Florida shrub features dark green leaves and clusters of bright red berries. It is an excellent choice for a natural hedge or border.
  3. Clusia: This shrub or small tree is known for its thick, leathery leaves and tolerance of various growing conditions, including full sun and shade.
  4. Firebush: This tropical shrub is ideal for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds, with its vibrant red-orange flowers and glossy green foliage.
  5. Walter’s viburnum: This evergreen shrub has glossy, dark green leaves and clusters of fragrant white flowers in the spring.

Other great options for alternatives to ficus include cocoplum, silver buttonwood, and green island ficus. All of these plants offer excellent aesthetic value and functionality for landscaping and gardening projects.

If you’re considering an alternative to ficus benjamina, it’s important to choose a plant that suits your needs and growing conditions. Consider factors such as sunlight, water requirements, and soil type when making your decision. Consulting with a professional landscaper or nursery can also be helpful in selecting the right plant for your specific needs.

Replacing your ficus hedge with a suitable alternative can help protect your landscape from the damaging effects of ficus whitefly infestations. With so many excellent options available, there’s no reason to continue relying on ficus for your landscaping needs. Take the first step towards a healthier and more beautiful landscape by exploring the alternatives to ficus today.

Tired of Paying for Whitefly treatments and Thinking of replacing Ficus benjamina hedges what are the alternatives?

Here are 30 Alternative to Ficus Hedge In South Florida

Cocoplum (Chrysobalanus icaco)

is a small to medium-sized evergreen shrub or tree that is native to the coastal areas of Florida, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Cocoplum can grow up to 15-25 feet tall, but it is usually maintained as a shrub around 6-8 feet in height through pruning.

Growth rate: Cocoplum is a slow to moderate grower, usually adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Cocoplum can tolerate a wide range of soil types, including sandy, loamy, and clay soils, as long as the soil is well-draining. It prefers soil with a pH between 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Cocoplum can grow in full sun to partial shade. However, it tends to produce more fruit and flowers in full sun.

Water: Cocoplum is a drought-tolerant plant, but it prefers regular watering during the growing season. Once established, it can handle occasional dry spells.

Soil pH: Cocoplum prefers a slightly acidic to neutral soil pH ranging from 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Cocoplum is hardy in USDA Zones 9 to 11, which includes coastal areas of the southeastern United States, southern Texas, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. It can be damaged by frost or freezing temperatures, so it may not be suitable for inland areas with colder winters.

Surinam cherry (Eugenia uniflora)

also known as pitanga, is a tropical fruit tree that is native to South America but is now grown in many tropical regions around the world. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Surinam cherry can grow up to 20-30 feet tall, but it is usually maintained as a smaller tree or shrub around 6-10 feet in height through pruning.

Growth rate: Surinam cherry is a fast-growing tree, adding around 2-3 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Surinam cherry prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter, such as sandy or loamy soils. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Surinam cherry prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much fruit in shady conditions.

Water: Surinam cherry requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Surinam cherry prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Surinam cherry is not cold-hardy and is only suitable for tropical and subtropical climates. It is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southernmost parts of Florida, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. It is often grown as an ornamental tree or for its edible fruit, which is tart and flavorful, and is used in jams, jellies, and beverages.

Marlberry (Ardisia squamulosa)

is a small evergreen shrub that is native to Florida and the Caribbean. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Marlberry typically grows 2-4 feet tall, but it can reach up to 8 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Marlberry is a slow-growing plant, adding around 6-12 inches of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Marlberry prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter, such as sandy or loamy soils. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Marlberry prefers partial shade to full shade. It can tolerate some sun, but it may not grow as well or look as healthy in sunny conditions.

Water: Marlberry requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Marlberry prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Marlberry is hardy in USDA Zones 9 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida, as well as coastal areas of the southeastern United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. It is often grown as an ornamental plant for its attractive foliage and berries, which are a food source for birds and other wildlife.

Myrsine (Myrsine floridana)

is a small evergreen shrub that is native to the southeastern United States, including Florida. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Myrsine typically grows 2-4 feet tall, but it can reach up to 6 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Myrsine is a slow-growing plant, adding around 6-12 inches of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Myrsine prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter, such as sandy or loamy soils. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Myrsine prefers partial shade to full shade. It can tolerate some sun, but it may not grow as well or look as healthy in sunny conditions.

Water: Myrsine requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Myrsine prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Myrsine is hardy in USDA Zones 8 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida, as well as coastal areas of the southeastern United States. It is often grown as an ornamental plant for its attractive foliage and berries, which are a food source for birds and other wildlife.

Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens)

is a small, slow-growing palm that is native to the southeastern United States, including Florida. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Saw palmetto typically grows 5-10 feet tall, but it can reach up to 20 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Saw palmetto is a slow-growing plant, adding around 1-2 inches of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Saw palmetto prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.0.

Sunlight: Saw palmetto prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much fruit in shady conditions.

Water: Saw palmetto is drought-tolerant and does not require regular watering once established. In fact, overwatering can be detrimental to the plant’s health.

Soil pH: Saw palmetto prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.0.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Saw palmetto is hardy in USDA Zones 8 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida, as well as coastal areas of the southeastern United States. It is often grown as an ornamental plant for its attractive foliage and as a source of food for wildlife. Saw palmetto berries are also used for medicinal purposes, particularly for prostate health.

Seagrape (Coccoloba uvifera)

is a large evergreen tree that is native to coastal areas of the Caribbean and Florida. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Seagrape typically grows 30-50 feet tall, but it can reach up to 60 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Seagrape is a fast-growing tree, adding around 2-3 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Seagrape prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Seagrape prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much fruit in shady conditions.

Water: Seagrape requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Seagrape prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Seagrape is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States. It is often grown as an ornamental tree for its attractive foliage and as a source of food for wildlife. Seagrape fruit is edible and is used to make jelly, jam, and wine.

Silver buttonwood (Conocarpus erectus ‘Sericeus’)

is a small to medium-sized evergreen tree or shrub that is commonly used for landscaping in coastal areas of Florida and the Caribbean. Here are some additional details about its characteristics, as well as any potential pests and diseases:

Height: Silver buttonwood typically grows 10-25 feet tall, but it can reach up to 35 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Silver buttonwood is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Silver buttonwood prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Silver buttonwood prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much foliage in shady conditions.

Water: Silver buttonwood is drought-tolerant and does not require regular watering once established. It can tolerate salt spray and is often used for coastal landscaping.

Soil pH: Silver buttonwood prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Silver buttonwood is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Pests: Silver buttonwood is relatively pest-resistant, but it may be affected by spider mites, mealybugs, scale insects, and whiteflies. Regular monitoring and insecticidal soap or horticultural oil treatments can help prevent or control infestations.

Diseases: Silver buttonwood is generally disease-resistant, but it may be affected by fungal diseases such as leaf spot, rust, and powdery mildew. Proper cultural practices such as adequate spacing, good air circulation, and avoiding overhead watering can help prevent disease issues. Fungicidal treatments may be necessary if disease problems persist.

Green buttonwood (Conocarpus erectus)

is a small to medium-sized evergreen tree or shrub that is native to coastal areas of the southeastern United States and the Caribbean. Here are some details about its characteristics, as well as any potential pests and diseases:

Height: Green buttonwood typically grows 10-25 feet tall, but it can reach up to 50 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Green buttonwood is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Green buttonwood prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Green buttonwood prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much foliage in shady conditions.

Water: Green buttonwood is drought-tolerant and does not require regular watering once established. It can tolerate salt spray and is often used for coastal landscaping.

Soil pH: Green buttonwood prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Green buttonwood is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Simpson stopper (Myrcianthes fragrans)

is a small to medium-sized evergreen tree or shrub that is native to Florida, the Caribbean, and Central America. Here are some details about its characteristics, as well as any potential pests and diseases:

Height: Simpson stopper typically grows 10-25 feet tall, but it can reach up to 40 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Simpson stopper is a slow-growing plant, adding around 6-12 inches of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Simpson stopper prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.0.

Sunlight: Simpson stopper prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much fruit in shady conditions.

Water: Simpson stopper requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Simpson stopper prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.0.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Simpson stopper is hardy in USDA Zones 9b to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Spanish stopper (Eugenia foetida)

is a small to medium-sized evergreen tree or shrub that is native to Florida, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. Here are some details about its characteristics, as well as any potential pests and diseases:

Height: Spanish stopper typically grows 15-30 feet tall, but it can reach up to 50 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Spanish stopper is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Spanish stopper prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Spanish stopper prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much fruit in shady conditions.

Water: Spanish stopper requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Spanish stopper prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Spanish stopper is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Nonnative firebush (Hamelia patens var. glabra)

is a tropical shrub that is native to Central and South America, but has been introduced as an ornamental plant in many parts of the world, including Florida. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Nonnative firebush typically grows 4-6 feet tall and wide, but it can reach up to 15 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Nonnative firebush is a fast-growing plant, adding around 2-3 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Nonnative firebush prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Nonnative firebush prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as many flowers in shady conditions.

Water: Nonnative firebush requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Nonnative firebush prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Nonnative firebush is hardy in USDA Zones 9b to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States. It may die back in colder climates but can resprout from the roots in spring.

Nonnative firebush is prized for its showy red-orange flowers, which attract hummingbirds and butterflies. It is often used in landscaping as a hedge, screen plant, or accent plant, and can also be grown in containers. However, as a nonnative plant, it is considered invasive in some areas and should be planted with caution.

The native firebush (Hamelia patens)

is a tropical shrub that is native to Florida, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Native firebush typically grows 6-12 feet tall and wide, but it can reach up to 20 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Native firebush is a fast-growing plant, adding around 2-3 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Native firebush prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Native firebush prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as many flowers in shady conditions.

Water: Native firebush requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Native firebush prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Native firebush is hardy in USDA Zones 9b to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States. It may die back in colder climates but can resprout from the roots in spring.

Native firebush is prized for its showy red-orange flowers, which attract hummingbirds and butterflies. It is often used in landscaping as a hedge, screen plant, or accent plant, and can also be grown in containers. As a native plant, it is a valuable food source for birds and other wildlife.

Copperleaf (Acalypha spp.)

is a tropical shrub that is prized for its colorful foliage. There are several species of copperleaf, with variations in leaf color and size. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Copperleaf typically grows 3-6 feet tall and wide, but some species can reach up to 10 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Copperleaf is a fast-growing plant, adding around 2-3 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Copperleaf prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Copperleaf prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not produce as much foliage or have as vibrant leaf color in shady conditions.

Water: Copperleaf requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Copperleaf prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Copperleaf is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States. It may die back in colder climates but can resprout from the roots in spring.

Copperleaf is prized for its colorful foliage, which can range from green to red, pink, yellow, or variegated. It is often used in landscaping as a border plant, accent plant, or container plant. However, some species of copperleaf can be invasive in certain areas, so it is important to research the specific species before planting.

Fiddlewood (Citharexylum fruticosum)

is a small to medium-sized evergreen tree or shrub that is native to Florida, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Fiddlewood typically grows 10-25 feet tall and wide, but it can reach up to 40 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Fiddlewood is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Fiddlewood prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Fiddlewood prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much foliage in shady conditions.

Water: Fiddlewood requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Fiddlewood prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Fiddlewood is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Fiddlewood is prized for its showy white flowers and fragrant foliage. It is often used in landscaping as a hedge, screen plant, or accent plant, and can also be grown in containers. It attracts pollinators such as bees and butterflies. Fiddlewood is relatively pest and disease-resistant, but it may be affected by spider mites, mealybugs, and scale insects. Regular monitoring and insecticidal soap or horticultural oil treatments can help prevent or control infestations.

Podocarpus macrophyllus

Commonly known as Japanese yew or Buddhist pine, is an evergreen tree that is native to East Asia. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Podocarpus macrophyllus typically grows 20-50 feet tall, but it can reach up to 100 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Podocarpus macrophyllus is a slow-growing plant, adding around 6-12 inches of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Podocarpus macrophyllus prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Podocarpus macrophyllus prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much foliage in shady conditions.

Water: Podocarpus macrophyllus requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Podocarpus macrophyllus prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Podocarpus macrophyllus is hardy in USDA Zones 7b to 11, which includes the southeastern and southwestern United States.

Podocarpus macrophyllus is prized for its dense, attractive foliage and can be used as a hedge, screen plant, or specimen tree. It can also be grown in containers. It is relatively pest and disease-resistant, but it may be affected by spider mites and scale insects. Regular monitoring and insecticidal soap or horticultural oil treatments can help prevent or control infestations.

Clusia lanceolata

also known as lanceleaf Clusia, is a tropical evergreen tree or shrub that is native to the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Clusia lanceolata typically grows 10-25 feet tall and wide, but it can reach up to 50 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Clusia lanceolata is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Clusia lanceolata prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Clusia lanceolata prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much foliage in shady conditions.

Water: Clusia lanceolata requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Clusia lanceolata prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Clusia lanceolata is hardy in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Clusia lanceolata is prized for its thick, leathery leaves and can be used as a hedge, screen plant, or specimen tree. It is also commonly grown in containers. It is relatively pest and disease-resistant, but it may be affected by scale insects and spider mites. Regular monitoring and insecticidal soap or horticultural oil treatments can help prevent or control infestations.

Mirrorleaf viburnum

also known as Viburnum odoratatissium “Awabuki”, is a popular evergreen shrub that is native to East Asia. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Mirrorleaf viburnum typically grows 10-12 feet tall and 6-8 feet wide, but it can reach up to 20 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Mirrorleaf viburnum is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Mirrorleaf viburnum prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Mirrorleaf viburnum prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as many flowers in shady conditions.

Water: Mirrorleaf viburnum requires regular watering during the growing season, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Mirrorleaf viburnum prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Mirrorleaf viburnum is hardy in USDA Zones 8b to 10, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Mirrorleaf viburnum is prized for its glossy, dark green leaves and fragrant, creamy-white flowers that bloom in the spring. It can be used in landscaping as a hedge, screen plant, or specimen plant, and can also be grown in containers. It is relatively pest and disease-resistant, but it may be affected by spider mites, scale insects, and aphids. Regular monitoring and insecticidal soap or horticultural oil treatments can help prevent or control infestations.

Dahoon holly (Ilex cassine)

Is a native evergreen tree or shrub that is found in wetlands and swampy areas in the southeastern United States. Dahoon holly is prized for its attractive glossy leaves, bright red berries, and its tolerance of wet soils. It can be used in landscaping as a specimen plant, in hedges, or as a screen plant.

Height: Dahoon holly typically grows 15-30 feet tall and 10-15 feet wide, but it can reach up to 50 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Dahoon holly is a slow to moderate-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Dahoon holly prefers moist to wet, acidic soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers soils with a pH range of 4.5 to 6.5.

Sunlight: Dahoon holly prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much fruit in shady conditions.

Water: Dahoon holly requires regular watering, especially during the establishment period, but it can tolerate brief periods of drought once established.

Soil pH: Dahoon holly prefers acidic soils with a pH range of 4.5 to 6.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Dahoon holly is hardy in USDA Zones 7b to 11, which includes the southeastern United States.

Areca palm (Dypsis lutescens)

is a popular tropical plant that is native to Madagascar. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Areca palm typically grows 6-10 feet tall and 3-5 feet wide, but it can reach up to 20 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Areca palm is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 6-10 inches of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Areca palm prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.0.

Sunlight: Areca palm prefers bright, indirect light. It can tolerate some direct sun, but it may not grow as well or produce as much foliage in full sun.

Water: Areca palm requires regular watering, especially during the growing season. It prefers evenly moist but well-drained soil, and it may suffer if the soil becomes too dry or too wet.

Soil pH: Areca palm prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.0.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Areca palm is a tropical plant that is not cold-hardy and is typically grown indoors in most parts of the United States. It can be grown outdoors in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Bay Laurel (Laurus nobilis)

is an evergreen tree or shrub that is native to the Mediterranean region. Bay Laurel is prized for its aromatic leaves, which are commonly used as a culinary seasoning. It can be grown in landscaping as a specimen plant or hedge, and can also be grown in containers. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Bay Laurel typically grows 20-30 feet tall and 10-20 feet wide, but it can be kept smaller with regular pruning.

Growth rate: Bay Laurel is a slow to moderate-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Bay Laurel prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Bay Laurel prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as much foliage in shady conditions.

Water: Bay Laurel requires regular watering during the establishment period, but it can tolerate some drought once established. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: Bay Laurel prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Bay Laurel is hardy in USDA Zones 8 to 10, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Gardenia

is a popular evergreen shrub that is prized for its fragrant and showy white flowers. It is native to tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa, and Oceania. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Gardenia typically grows 2-6 feet tall and 3-5 feet wide, but it can reach up to 12 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Gardenia is a slow to moderate-growing plant, adding around 6-12 inches of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Gardenia prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter. It requires acidic soils with a pH range of 5.0 to 6.5.

Sunlight: Gardenia prefers bright, indirect light. It can tolerate some direct sun, but it may not grow as well or produce as many flowers in full sun.

Water: Gardenia requires regular watering, especially during the establishment period. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: Gardenia requires acidic soils with a pH range of 5.0 to 6.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Gardenia is hardy in USDA Zones 8 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Gardenia is prized for its attractive glossy leaves and fragrant white flowers, which bloom from late spring to early summer. It can be used in landscaping as a specimen plant or hedge, and can also be grown in containers. It is relatively pest and disease-resistant, but it may be affected by scale insects, spider mites, and fungal diseases such as powdery mildew. Regular monitoring and insecticidal soap or horticultural oil treatments can help prevent or control infestations.

Walter’s Viburnum (Viburnum obovatum)

is a popular evergreen shrub that is native to the southeastern United States. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Walter’s Viburnum typically grows 6-12 feet tall and 6-8 feet wide, but it can reach up to 20 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Walter’s Viburnum is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Walter’s Viburnum prefers moist to wet, acidic soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers soils with a pH range of 4.5 to 6.5.

Sunlight: Walter’s Viburnum prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as many flowers in shady conditions.

Water: Walter’s Viburnum requires regular watering, especially during the establishment period. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: Walter’s Viburnum prefers acidic soils with a pH range of 4.5 to 6.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Walter’s Viburnum is hardy in USDA Zones 7 to 11, which includes the southeastern United States.

Walter’s Viburnum is prized for its attractive glossy leaves and fragrant white flowers, which bloom in the spring. It can be used in landscaping as a specimen plant or hedge, and can also be grown in containers.

Thunbergia erecta

also known as King’s Mantle, is a tropical shrub that is native to Africa. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Thunbergia erecta typically grows 3-6 feet tall and 2-4 feet wide, but it can reach up to 8 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Thunbergia erecta is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Thunbergia erecta prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Thunbergia erecta prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as many flowers in shady conditions.

Water: Thunbergia erecta requires regular watering, especially during the establishment period. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: Thunbergia erecta prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Thunbergia erecta is not cold-hardy and is typically grown as an annual or as a container plant in most parts of the United States. It can be grown as a perennial in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Thunbergia erecta is prized for its attractive glossy leaves and showy flowers, which bloom in clusters in the summer and fall. It can be used in landscaping as a specimen plant, hedge, or container plant.

Bougainvillea (Bougainvillea spectabilis)

is a popular tropical shrub or vine that is native to South America. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Bougainvillea typically grows 10-30 feet tall as a vine, or 3-6 feet tall as a shrub. However, it can reach up to 40 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Bougainvillea is a fast-growing plant, adding around 3-6 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Bougainvillea prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Bougainvillea prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as many flowers in shady conditions.

Water: Bougainvillea requires regular watering during the establishment period, but it can tolerate some drought once established. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: Bougainvillea prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Bougainvillea is not cold-hardy and is typically grown as an annual or as a container plant in most parts of the United States. It can be grown as a perennial in USDA Zones 9b to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Bougainvillea is prized for its attractive foliage and showy bracts, which are often mistaken for flowers. The bracts come in a range of colors, including pink, purple, red, orange, and white, and they bloom repeatedly throughout the growing season. Bougainvillea can be used in landscaping as a vine, ground cover, hedge, or container plant.

Wild coffee (Psychotria nervosa)

is a native shrub or small tree that is commonly found in the understory of hammocks and other wooded areas throughout South Florida. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Wild coffee typically grows 3-12 feet tall, but can reach up to 20 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Wild coffee is a slow-growing plant, adding around 6-12 inches of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Wild coffee prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Wild coffee prefers partial shade to full shade. It can tolerate some sun, but it may not grow as well or produce as many berries in sunny conditions.

Water: Wild coffee requires regular watering, especially during the establishment period. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: Wild coffee prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Wild coffee is hardy in USDA Zones 9b to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Wild coffee is prized for its attractive foliage and berries, which are a food source for wildlife. It can be used in landscaping as a specimen plant, hedge, or understory plant in shaded areas.

Green Island Ficus (Ficus microcarpa “Green Island”)

is a popular evergreen shrub that is native to Asia and Australia. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Green Island Ficus typically grows 3-6 feet tall and 4-6 feet wide, but it can reach up to 10 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Green Island Ficus is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Green Island Ficus prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Green Island Ficus prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as many leaves in shady conditions.

Water: Green Island Ficus requires regular watering, especially during the establishment period. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: Green Island Ficus prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Green Island Ficus is not cold-hardy and is typically grown as a container plant or as a hedge in USDA Zones 10 to 11, which includes the southern parts of Florida and coastal areas of the southeastern United States.

Green Island Ficus is prized for its attractive glossy leaves and dense growth habit, which make it a popular choice for hedges or screens. It can also be used as a container plant or as a specimen plant in landscaping.

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)

is a native shrub that is commonly found in wooded areas and along the edges of swamps and marshes throughout the southeastern United States. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: American Beautyberry typically grows 3-6 feet tall and wide, but can reach up to 10 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: American Beautyberry is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: American Beautyberry prefers well-draining soils that are rich in organic matter. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 6.5.

Sunlight: American Beautyberry prefers partial shade to full sun. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not produce as many berries in shady conditions.

Water: American Beautyberry requires regular watering, especially during the establishment period. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: American Beautyberry prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 6.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: American Beautyberry is hardy in USDA Zones 7 to 11, which includes most of Florida and the southeastern United States.

American Beautyberry

is prized for its attractive foliage and berries, which are a food source for wildlife. It can be used in landscaping as a specimen plant or as a shrub border in naturalized areas.

Florida privet (Forestiera segregata) is a native shrub that is commonly found in coastal hammocks, pinelands, and other wooded areas throughout Florida and the southeastern United States. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Florida privet typically grows 10-15 feet tall, but can be pruned to maintain a smaller size.

Growth rate: Florida privet is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Florida privet prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

Sunlight: Florida privet prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as many flowers in shady conditions.

Water: Florida privet requires regular watering, especially during the establishment period. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: Florida privet prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 6.0 to 7.5.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Florida privet is hardy in USDA Zones 8 to 11, which includes most of Florida and the southeastern United States.

Florida privet is prized for its attractive foliage, which turns yellow in the fall, and its fragrant flowers, which bloom in early spring. It can be used in landscaping as a specimen plant, hedge, or screen in naturalized areas.

Wax myrtle (Morella cerifera)

also known as southern wax myrtle or bayberry, is a native shrub or small tree that is commonly found in wetlands, marshes, and other coastal habitats throughout the southeastern United States. Here are some details about its characteristics:

Height: Wax myrtle typically grows 10-20 feet tall, but can reach up to 30 feet in optimal growing conditions.

Growth rate: Wax myrtle is a moderate to fast-growing plant, adding around 1-2 feet of new growth per year.

Soil needed: Wax myrtle prefers well-draining soils that are sandy or loamy. It can tolerate a wide range of soil pH, but it prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.0.

Sunlight: Wax myrtle prefers full sun to partial shade. It can tolerate some shade, but it may not grow as well or produce as many berries in shady conditions.

Water: Wax myrtle requires regular watering, especially during the establishment period. It prefers soil that is evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Soil pH: Wax myrtle prefers slightly acidic to neutral soils with a pH range of 5.5 to 7.0.

USDA Hardiness Zone: Wax myrtle is hardy in USDA Zones 7 to 10, which includes most of Florida and the southeastern United States.

Wax myrtle is prized for its fragrant foliage and berries, which are a food source for wildlife. It can be used in landscaping as a specimen plant, hedge, or screen in naturalized areas.

If you need to treat your ficus Protect Your Ficus Trees Today: Act Now to Prevent Devastating Ficus Whitefly Infestations!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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